A live-work studio-gallery in Kensington Market, Toronto, Canada. 

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Javid (JAH)

 

Selfportrait (when I was 3). Latex on wood. 12″ x 36″. 2008.

 

Javid is an Arabic name that means eternal.

His work as a painter, graphic designer and muralist is dedicated to revealing the architectural spirit of letters and faces, inspired by the principles of Arabic calligraphy, graffiti art, and portraiture. Javid is available for custom portraits and calligraphic paintings, on canvas or walls. He also manages Under the Radar (undertheradarto.com), a youth-led social enterprise specializing in graphic design, mural painting and screen printing, located at the LOFT Youth Centre for Social Enterprise and Innovation (loftycsei.org) in Downtown Toronto.

Currently, Javid is pursuing a Masters in Architecture at the University of Toronto. His goal is to design sustainable arts spaces in developing urban societies, addressing needs specific to the context of education, youth, street art and social enterpreneurship.

 

davidwithaj@gmail.com

davidwithaj.tumblr.com

 

Inside-Out

One of the key problems with the Atkinson’s Co-op/Alexandra Park (hitherto referred to as the “Site”) is its incongruity with surrounding typologies and city grain (namely Chinatown, Kensington Market and West Queen West). Reflected in building typology as well as thoroughfare (foot and vehicle), the divergence of the Site’s fabric perpetuates its so-called isolation, inaccessibility, and subdued role as a vibrant residential community in Downtown Toronto.

Addressing the Site’s urgency to reconcile with the Downtown grid, for example, as a strategy to liberate its constituents (ie. Allowing Augusta street to penetrate the Site in entirety, or Grange to meet Spadina going eastbound) is not the only driving force behind proposals. It would be a drastic oversight to ignore the commercial implications of increasing the density of the Site by upwards of 200%, such as in the current proposal for the Site where nearly 5000 new market value units will be developed (currently there are less than a thousand total RGI units).  What is ironic about this economic drive to inject the Site with a blossoming community of first-time condo-buyers aka “Annex-graduates-weary-of-King-street-elitism” is that it is premised on a belief that downtown residents would prefer to live close to many local, family-owned businesses, as well as access the entertainment districts spilling over from Ossington and Richmond onto Queen West.

That is, to what extent are the family-owned, storefront-home living typologies stimulants to the culture of local shopping and entertainment that characterize the thriving districts surrounding the site? If the bordering zones of the site possess a disproportionately large number of families living in the same buildings as their businesses, and further acknowledge that they are either profitable, reputable or popular role players in the community at-large, is there sufficient grounds to explore this living typology as a strategy for reinvigorating the Site?

Even if the statistics state otherwise, the sectional qualities of this arrangement are interesting in terms of how public and private spaces are reversed if a storefront-houseback typology were extended south from Kensington Market and North from Queen West onto the site.

 

 

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The Glass Box

Light It Up is a studio project for a building that would be an arts centre for transdisciplinary research at University of Toronto, Canada. The site is across from Robarts Library – an icon of brutalist architecture and one of the largest libraries in Canada. My proposal explores the idea of transparency through material and social organization. Structurally, I propose a building made entirely of glass. In terms of my approach to the program of mixing studio, dining/social, gallery and library spaces, the notion of transparency drives the focus on visibility of the gallery from all public spaces.

The interior environment is driven by play of light through varying levels of translucency. The close up of cast glass reveals the change in orientation of the glass paneling, so the thickness of the glass is exposed, strengthening the structural ambition of the material and exploring the varying degrees of privacy obtained through the use of layering.

 

 

Light It Up

Light It Up is a studio project for a building that would be an arts centre for transdisciplinary research at University of Toronto, Canada. The site is across from Robarts Library – an icon of brutalist architecture and one of the largest libraries in Canada. My proposal explores the idea of transparency through material and social organization. Structurally, I propose a building made entirely of glass. In terms of my approach to the program of mixing studio, dining/social, gallery and library spaces, the notion of transparency drives the focus on visibility of the gallery from all public spaces.

The interior environment is driven by play of light through varying levels of translucency. The close up of cast glass reveals the change in orientation of the glass paneling, so the thickness of the glass is exposed, strengthening the structural ambition of the material and exploring the varying degrees of privacy obtained through the use of layering.

 

 

ReDiscovery: Houston

The following is the proposal submitted for the ULI Urban Design Competition 2012. The site was downtown Houston, and the challenge was to design 16-acre master plan with an interdisciplinary team of graduate students within two weeks. Our team (5191) consisted of students completing their Masters degrees in Planning, Finance, Landscape Architecture and Architecture.

Our proposal was about ReDiscovering Downtown Houston – facilitating renewed interest in living and playing downtown, where there is currently an exodus outside of office hours. Our submission included six 11″ x 17″ panels and a Pro Forma, which breaks down the costs and anticipated revenues from purchasing, developing and maintaining the site over a 10 year period.

Much love to my teammates Anthonia Ogundele (Captain!), Josh Warkentin, Riaz Nathu and Noah Shumate for their hard work and dedication to pull off this competition in two weeks!

 
Home 2012 February
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